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The Office of the Child’s Representative is committed to providing an environment free from discrimination and harassment based on race, age, creed, color, religion, national origin or ancestry, sex, gender, disability, veteran status, genetic information, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, or pregnancy. The OCR is an equal opportunity/affirmative action employer fully committed to achieving a diverse work force. The OCR invites all applicants to include in their cover letter a statement about how your unique background and/or experiences might contribute to the diversity, cultural vitality and perspective of GAL and CLR practice.

Interested in becoming an OCR contract attorney? – OCR has open applications each March. Outside of March, if you’re interested in becoming an OCR contract attorney, send an email to info@coloradochildrep.org making sure to include 1) your resume and 2) preferred judicial districts and case types. Though it is not the norm, if a need arises, an OCR staff attorney may contact you directly. You can also read or subscribe to OCR’s Training Tuesdays email bulletin for info on upcoming OCR trainings and OCR’s quarterly newsletter for additional news and resources.

Entry Level Case Coordinator – Colorado Springs Details here.

OCR also accepts applications from law student interns. If you are interested in a law internship, please email ashleychase@coloradochildrep.org.

Click on another heading below for more information!

A Court Appointed Special Advocate or CASA is a volunteer assigned by a judge to a case within the dependency and neglect (D&N) system. Children in such cases are the victims of abuse and neglect and are often removed from their homes and families during the process. D&N cases are civil proceedings that aim to find permanency for the child or children involved.

CASA volunteers focus on the child or children within a single case. Their responsibilities are outlined with the Children’s Code of the Colorado Revised Statutes. By giving their attention to one case, CASA volunteers develop a depth of understanding and awareness about the children involved, ensuring that important details are brought to the other professionals, such as Case Workers and Guardian ad litems (GALs). Most importantly, CASA volunteers act as the child’s voice throughout the process, making sure that their needs are met, and that their voices are heard.

To find your local CASA program and to learn more about the steps to becoming a CASA volunteer, please visit Colorado Casa.

Bridging the Gap (BTG) is a youth success initiative at Mile High United Way. This unique program provides direct service to foster youth who age out of care by helping to bridge the gap between foster care and adult self-sufficiency. Many youth who age out of foster care face homelessness and a lack of resources.

New participants are granted an 18 month Section 8 housing voucher from the Family Unification Program, and are assigned to an Independent Living Coordinator.  These coordinators are available to support the youth and to assist in utilizing resources and achieving educational and professional goals.  BTG offers educational scholarships for youth and it also oversees “individual development accounts” which are matched savings accounts frequently used for housing, education, and transportation costs.

BTG offers signature events throughout the year, giving participants the opportunity to educate themselves, to network, to learn skills, and to utilize resources and socialize. Every year BTG hosts a Christmas party where every youth is given a present.  For many youth, this is the only holiday festivity they have available. One of the best services that BTG provides is a civic engagement program, which gives former foster youth an opportunity to participate in supporting legislation to reform Colorado’s foster care system.

 To donate to BTG or to learn more, please visit Mile High United Way, Bridging the Gap